Trump’s promise to vaccinate all Americans by April unrealistic – experts

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New research shows the fear that the vaccine approval process is being fast-tracked is causing Americans to worry the vaccine won’t be safe, and as a result, they are less likely to get vaccinated.

U.S. President Trump leads coronavirus task force daily briefing at the White House in Washington (photo credit: REUTERS)

U.S. President Trump leads coronavirus task force daily briefing at the White House in Washington

(photo credit: REUTERS)

In a briefing Friday, President Donald Trump said that by April there will be a coronavirus vaccine for every American, according to CNN. This assertion is not supported by any possible timelines suggested by federal government health agencies.

Director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Dr. Robert Redfield said at a Senate appropriations committee hearing that it would be late spring or summer of 2021 before widespread vaccination is possible in the US. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the National Institute of Allergy and Infections Diseases director, stated that he agreed with Redfeild’s assessment.

Vaccine expert Dr. Peter Hotez told CNN that Trump’s promise is unrealistic and that “there’s too may unknowns right now” for the president to make such claims. Hotez went on to say that it is currently not known if the vaccines in clinical trials “even work or if they are safe.”

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Trump also said that he thinks “distribution will go even quicker than most people think,” and that distribution will begin within 24 hours of the vaccine being ready, according to KVCR News. But distribution is likely to be complicated and time-consuming, experts told CNN.

New research by the Pew Research Center shows that fear that the vaccine approval process is being fast-tracked is causing Americans to lose faith that the vaccine produced will be safe, and as a result, they are less likely to get vaccinated.

“Nearly eight-in-ten (78%) say their greater concern is that the vaccine approval process will move too fast, without fully establishing that it is safe and effective,” according to the Pew poll.

Among Americans who say that they would not get the vaccine, 76% say that fear of possible side effects is a major reason in keeping them from getting vaccinated.

Only 51% of Americans said that they would definitely or probably get a vaccine. This is a 21% drop since May when 72% of respondents in a Pew poll said that they would definitely or probably be vaccinated.

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Today, 49% of Americans say that they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine.

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