Bottom line: Sony’s gigantic PS5 and its recent hardware teardown potentially alleviated cooling concerns for a lot of gamers looking forward to firing up their console in just a few weeks. In addition to using liquid metal, a chunky heatsink, and air vents peppered around the entire console, Sony has revealed that it’ll also collect data on the PS5’s thermal performance and adjust the console’s large 120mm cooling fan with future software updates to keep any potential heat issues in check.

For PlayStation fans, Sony’s version of Flight Simulator was arguably its thermal management on the PS4, particularly the Pro model with its famous jet engine noise. The PS5, however, is unlikely to replicate that experience, especially with all the heat-optimized hardware that’s reportedly near-silent under load even after extended use.

Sony’s recent PS5 teardown revealed the cool measures it took to address the console’s heat dissipation performance. We saw liquid metal utilized for the SoC, which according to Sony’s engineering vice president, Yasuhiro Ootori, was done to “ensure long-term, stable, high-cooling performance.” It would also be helped by the massive copper-aluminum heatsink and lots of air vents around the console’s large exterior.

What ultimately led to the PS5’s rather sizable footprint, though, is its double-sided 120mm-diameter, 45mm-thick cooling fan. In an interview with Japanese gaming site 4Gamer, Yasuhiro Ootori said that Sony will also be able to adjust the PS5’s fan speed with future firmware updates.

The fan, Ootori says, uses data from three temperature sensors on the mainboard, and as upcoming PS5 games arrive, Sony will collect info on the console’s thermal performance for each title and be able to modify the fan’s control parameters via online updates to ensure optimum heat dissipation. Should a demanding game stress the console for extended periods of time, Ootori notes that the fan’s rpm would be increased to favor cooling at the expense of quietness.

With many first- and third-party games currently in development for the PS5, Sony could also work with developers to come up with a thermal/heat profile for their games to resolve issues beforehand and then issue firmware updates to PS5 owners around the world whenever a major title is about to launch on their console.