According to a research, 20% of Americans believe microchips are embedded in COVID-19 vaccinations.

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False material about the microchip hypothesis has been shared on social media, with many conspiracy theorists claiming that COVID-19 is a coverup to track people who get vaccinations.

A medical worker holds a syringe with Sputnik V (Gam-COVID-Vac) vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) before administering an injection at a vaccination centre in a shopping mall in Saint Petersburg, Russia February 24, 2021. (photo credit: REUTERS)

20% of Americans believe in the conspiracy theory that microchips may have been planted inside COVID-19 vaccines that millions of people have already taken worldwide, according to a study by YouGov and The Economist that was conducted last week.

Despite a lack of evidence to support such a claim, the poll concluded overall that 15% of Americans said this conspiracy theory was “probably true” while another 5% said it was “definitely true.”

According to the same study, 27% of respondents aged 30-44 agreed with this view. The hypothesis was believed by 8% of Biden voters and 29% of Trump backers. The same opinion was expressed by 14% of Democratic voters and 32% of Republican voters.

COVID-19 misinformation has been a contentious topic throughout the last year. Recently, US Vice President Joe Biden stated that disinformation about the virus circulating on social media is “killing people.”

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False material about the microchip hypothesis has been shared on social media, with many conspiracy theorists claiming that COVID-19 is merely a coverup for international governments and businesses to track millions of people via vaccinations.

Other conspiracy theorists have accused Bill and Melinda Gates of being behind the alleged scheme. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation responded by telling the BBC that this is totally “false.”

In January, in response to allegations that the COVID-19 vaccination causes infertility or includes pork-derived ingredients, several Jewish physicians warned against the conspiracy, claiming that there is “absolutely no evidence” to support this claim.

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